Twm Morys

Twm

TWM MORYS was born in Oxford in 1961 and brought up in Gwynedd, north Wales and Breconshire in the south-east. One of Wales's most intriguing literary figures, Twm Morys is a poet and harper who also writes for television and radio, as well as lyrics, which he sings with his folk-rock group, Bob Delyn a'r Ebillion. After graduating from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, he has worked for BBC Radio Cymru and as a lecturer at Rennes University. In addition to three volumes of poetry (Ofn fy Het, 1995; Eldorado, 1999, with Iwan Llwyd; 2, 2002), Twm Morys has written an important body of essays as columnist for various literary reviews. A son of the writer Jan Morris, he has collaborated with her on the two volumes, Wales, the First Place (Random House, 1982) and A Machynlleth Triad/Triawd Machynlleth (Penguin, 2004). Ein Llyw Cyntaf (Gomer, 2001) is his Welsh adaptation of Jan Morris's novel Our First Leader. Twm Morys is the new editor of Barddas, Britain’s second best-selling poetry magazine.

Twm Morys ar Datgeiniaid

Datgeiniaeth, Welsh medieval poetical declamation, is a project based on Peter Greenhill's research on medieval Welsh strict metre poetry and the Robert ap Huw manuscript, a collection of Welsh medieval harp music for brass or metal strung harp. This is the oldest such collection in the world (See Paul Dooley's "Music from the Robert ap Huw Manuscript" for Peter Greenhill's arrangements of some musical pieces from the period - http://www.pauldooley.com/).

Also known as Cerdd Dafod - the craft of the tongue - as performed in medieval Wales, and in this case to the accompaniment of the regular beating of the staff.

Y Datgeiniaid:

Twm Morys (main vocal, staff),

Gareth Sion, Rhys Trimble, Gorwel Roberts (backing vocals)

Einion Gruffudd (Breton bombard)

W. L. Richards (ed.), Gwaith Dafydd Llwyd o Fathafarn (University of Wales Press, 1964). The edited texts, in Welsh.

"Awdl i Ddewi" - A poem calling for St David's aid in battle, thought to be composed for the Battle of Bosworth 1485. Maybe a kind of Welsh Haka on strict metre (cywydd llosgyrnog) for a life or death conflict, not a game of rugby! The Welsh-Norman lords who took part in the conquest of Ireland would chant St David's name in battle so the concept of St David as a kind of a war god was long established.

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